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Standard Poodle 



Description: The Standard Poodle is a medium- to large-sized dog. When groomed to show dog standards the body is meant to give off a square appearance. It is approximately the same length as the height at the withers. The skull is moderately rounded with a slight but definite stop. It has a long, straight muzzle. The dark, oval-shaped eyes are set somewhat far apart and are black or brown. The ears hang close to the head and are long and flat. Both the front and back legs are in proportion with the size of the dog. The topline is level. The tail is set and carried high. It is sometimes docked to half its length or less to make the dog look more balanced. Dewclaws may be removed. The oval-shaped feet are rather small and the toes are arched. The coat is either curly or corded. It comes in all solid colors including black, blue, silver, gray, cream, apricot, red, white, silver beige, brown or café-au-lait. While it does not make the written show standard, there are also parti-colored and phantom colored Poodles.  Many of the two toned colors are registerable with AKC under their correct color.

Hypoallergenic: Yes

Life Span: 12 – 15 years

Height: Standard Poodle 15 – 27 in. but can be taller.  There is no limit on height in the standard classification just that they be 15 inches and above.

Weight:
Most Males are 45-70 pounds, Females 45-60 pounds  Their is weight is not set by AKC standards only height minimum. Poodles can weigh more or less but these are averages.

Temperament: Instinctual, Alert, Faithful, Active, Intelligent, Trainable.

The Standard Poodle is proud, graceful, noble, good-natured, enjoyable and cheerful. This highly intelligent dog is one of the most trainable breeds. Some can be trained to hunt. The Standard Poodle is generally lower energy and often calmer than the smaller varieties of Poodles, but will become high strung if you do not give it the proper amount of exercise and time.  It is sensitive to the tone of one's voice and will not listen if it senses that it is stronger minded than its owner, however it will also not respond well to harsh discipline. Owners need to be calm, yet possess an air of natural authority. It are not the type of dog to live outside in a kennel, as it enjoys being with its owners and dislikes being alone. It is generally friendly toward strangers, and is excellent with children. The Standard Poodle is good with other dogs. Some can make good guard dogs. Make sure you are this dog's firm, consistent, confident pack leader.

Origin:
France

Health:
A long-lived breed, Poodles are, nevertheless, subject to several diseases. Runny eyes, cataracts and progressive retinal atrophy, which may cause blindness. Allergies and skin conditions are common, possibly due to unskilled use of clippers or allergies to shampoo and/or color reinforcer. Hip dysplasia and ear infections are also common. They are prone to Von Willebrand's Disease. Prone to bloat,  so it is wise to feed your Standard 2-3 small meals a day, rather than one large one.

Exercise and Living Conditions:
If given enough exercise, Standard Poodles are relatively inactive indoors. They will be okay in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. A small yard will suffice.  The Standard Poodle needs to be taken on a daily walk. Although they adore water and love to go for walks, Poodles are not demanding as far as exercise goes, so long as they get their walk in. They however, will keep in better spirits and be fitter if given regular opportunities to run and play off the leash in a safe area. The Standard retains its sporting instincts, has great stamina, and needs more activity than the smaller varieties.

Grooming:
Poodles must be bathed regularly and clipped every six to eight weeks since their hair is non shedding and continually grows. Clean and check the ears frequently for wax or mites or infection and pull out hairs growing inside the ear.   Poodles shed little to no hair and are good for allergy sufferers!

Genetics Tests:

DM -
Degenerative Myelopathy is a progressive neurological disorder that affects the spinal cord of dogs. Dogs that have inherited two defective copies will experience a breakdown of the cells responsible for sending and receiving signals from the brain, resulting in neurological symptoms.

 

The disease often begins with an unsteady gait, and the dog may wobble when they attempt to walk. As the disease progresses, the dog's hind legs will weaken and eventually the dog will be unable to walk at all. Degenerative Myelopathy moves up the body, so if the disease is allowed to progress, the dog will eventually be unable to hold his bladder and will lose normal function in its front legs. Fortunately, there is no direct pain associated with Degenerative Myelopathy.

 

The onset of Degenerative Myelopathy generally occurs later in life starting at an average age of about 8 years. However, some dogs may begin experiencing symptoms much earlier, some later, and a small percentage of dogs that have inherited two copies of the mutation will not experience symptoms at all. Thus, this disease is not completely penetrant, meaning that while a dog with the mutation is highly likely to develop Degenerative Myelopathy, the disease does not affect every dog that has the genotype.


NEwS- Neonatal encephalopathy with seizures is an autosomal recessive disease of standard poodle puppies. Affected puppies are small and weak at birth. Many die in their first week of life. Those surviving past 1 week develop ataxia, a whole-body tremor and by 4 to 6 weeks of age, severe generalized clonic-tonic seizures. None have survived to 7 weeks of age. Cerebella from affected puppies were reduced in size.

 

This fatal disease affects the brain of newborn puppies causing weakness and seizures and ultimately death within a few weeks of birth.  Neonatal encephalopathy is recessive — both parents must possess the gene mutation in order to produce offspring affected by the disease.  Dogs with one copy of this gene do not show symptom, but are carriers and can pass the gene to their offspring.



vWD1 - Von Willebrand disease is an inherited bleeding disorder that inhibits the normal blood clotting process, causing prolonged bleeding after an injury. People with this condition often experience excessive bruising, prolonged nosebleeds, and excessive bleeding following any form of trauma, including surgery, or dental work.

 

The primary function of von Willebrand factor a blood glycoprotein, is to bind itself to other proteins. The deficiency or failure of vWF function inhibits the blood coagulation process and causes bleeding which is most apparent in tissues having high blood flow or narrow vessels.


PRA-prcd - Progressive Retinal Atrophy

Progressive Rod-cone degeneration, or PRA-prcd, is a form of Progressive retinal Atrophy (PRA) in which the cells in the retina of a dog degenerate and die. PRA is the dog equivalent of retinitis pigmentosa in humans. Most affected dogs will not show signs of vision loss until 3-5 years of age. Complete blindness can occur in older dogs. Progressive Rod-Cone Degeneration is a form of PRA known to affect over 40 different breeds.

 

The retina is a membrane located in the back of the eye that contains two types of cells known as photoreceptors. These cells take light coming into the eyes and relay it back to the brain as electrical impulses. These impulses are interpreted by the brain as vision. In dogs suffering from PRA-prcd, the photoreceptors begin to degenerate, causing an inability to interpret changes in light resulting in loss of vision. Rod cells, which are normally function in low-light, begin to degenerate first, leading to night-blindness. The cone cells, which normally function in bright-light or daytime conditions, will deteriorate next. This often leads to complete blindness over time.

 

PRA-prcd is inherited as an autosomal recessive disorder. A dog must have two copies of the mutated gene to be affected by PRA. A dog can have one copy of the mutation and not experience any symptoms of the disease. Dogs with one copy of the mutation are known as carriers, meaning that they can pass on the mutation to potential offspring. If they breed with another carrier, there is a 25% chance that the offspring can inherit one copy of the mutated gene from each parent, and be affected by the disease.